Chapter 90.2 General View on Cheese

This Chapter will be about listing types of cheese by country ….and it’s a lot !

Africa

Egypt

Ethiopia

Mauritania

South Africa

Asia

Armenia

Azerbaijan

Bangladesh

Bhutan

  • Chhurpi
  • Chhurpi( Nepali: छुर्पी ) is a traditional cheese consumed in the Himalayanregion. There are two varieties of chhurpi – soft variety (consumed as a side dish with rice) and hard variety (chewed like a betel nut).Chhurpi is prepared in a local dairy or at home from buttermilk. The buttermilk is boiled and the solid mass that is obtained is separated from the liquid and wrapped and hung in a thin cloth to drain out the water. The product is rather like the Italian riccota, which also is got from whey. It is soft, white and neutral in taste. However, it is often left to ferment a bit to acquire a tangy taste.To prepare the hard variety, the soft chhurpi is wrapped in a jute bag and pressed hard to get rid of the water. After it dries, it is cut into small cuboidal pieces and hung over fire to harden it further.

China

  • Rubing
  • Rubing (Chinese: 乳饼; pinyin: rǔbǐng) is a firm, fresh goat milk cheese made in the Yunnan Province of China by people of the Bai and Sani (recognized as a branch of the Yi in China) minorities.Its Bai name is youdbap, meaning “goat’s milk”. It is made by mixing heated goat’s milk and a souring agent, traditionally a mixture called năiténg (奶藤; lit. ‘milk cane’) made from a cultivated vine. It is often served pan fried, and dipped in salt, sugar, or málà powder. It may also be stir fried with vegetables in place of tofu.Much like paneer or queso blanco, it is an unaged, acid-set, non-melting farmer cheese, but with the aroma of fresh goat’s milk.
  • Rushan
  • Rushan (; pinyin: rǔshān, lit. “milk fan”) is a cow’s milk cheese of Yunnan, China. It is traditionally made by the Bai people, who call it nvxseiz, the etymology of which is unclear.It is flat and has a leathery texture. It may be served fried or grilled and rolled up on a stick.The Mandarin name means “milk fan” as it is said to resemble a folding fan.When served grilled (often as a street food), it is usually spread with various sweet condiments and rolled around a stick, resembling a popsicle. Some of the popular toppings include sweetened condensed milk, rose petal infused honey, chocolate syrup, and fruit preserves.If it is served deep fried, the cheese changes its texture and becomes somewhat flaky.
  • Nguri
  • Nguri (Chinese: 牛乳; pinyin: niurŭ; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: ngu5-ri2; lit. “bovine milk”) is a buffalo’s milk cheese of Fujian province, China. It is in a ball-shape approximately the size of a table tennis ball and has a soft, leathery texture. It is made by shaping with a cheese cloth the mixture of milk and vinegar that has been marinated in a salty brine.It is served as a condiment to plain rice congee. A small bite of this condiment could complement a large mouthful of plain congee, as it is very salty.It is also sometimes referred to as Giam-ngu-ring (Chinese: 鹹牛奶; pinyin: xianniunai; lit. “salty milk”), and is said to originate from Jiaomei in Zhangzhou, Fujian.
  • Chura kampo
  • Chura kampo (Tibetan dried cheese) is a Tibetan cheese and important within the cuisine of Tibet. Chura kampo is made from the curds that are left over from boiling buttermilk.There are many possible shapes for chura kampo. Small pieces of Chura kampo are eaten similarly to how candy bars are eaten in Western countries. This cheese is composed of little chunks of dried hard cheese that last long when it is chewed.
  • Chura loenpa
  • Chura loenpa is a Tibetan cheese important within the cuisine of Tibet. It is a soft cheese, similar to cottage cheese, made from the curds that are left over from boiling buttermilk.
  • Chhurpi
  • Chhurpi( Nepali: छुर्पी ) is a traditional cheese consumed in the Himalayan region. There are two varieties of chhurpi – soft variety (consumed as a side dish with rice)and hard variety (chewed like a betel nut).Chhurpi is prepared in a local dairy or at home from buttermilk.The buttermilk is boiled and the solid mass that is obtained is separated from the liquid and wrapped and hung in a thin cloth to drain out the water. The product is rather like the Italian riccota, which also is got from whey. It is soft, white and neutral in taste. However, it is often left to ferment a bit to acquire a tangy taste.To prepare the hard variety, the soft chhurpi is wrapped in a jute bag and pressed hard to get rid of the water. After it dries, it is cut into small cuboidal pieces and hung over fire to harden it further.

Georgia

  • Suluguni
  • Sulguni (Georgian: სულგუნი; Mingrelian: სელეგინ; Abkhaz: ашә, ашәлагәан) is a pickled Georgian cheese from the Samegrelo region. It has a sour, moderately salty flavor, a dimpled texture, and an elastic consistency; these attributes are the result of the process used, as is the source of its moniker “pickle cheese”. Its color ranges from white to pale yellow. Sulguni is often deep-fried, which masks its odor. It is often served in wedges.A typical sulguni cheese is shaped as a flat disc, 2.5 to 3.5 centimeters thick. It weighs 0.5 to 1.5 kilograms and contains 50% water and between 1% and 5% salt. Dry fat content averages 45% Sulguni is produced only of natural ingredients: normalized cow milk by clotting by rennet with pure cultures of lactic bacteria.

India

  • Bandel
  • Paneer
  • Paneer (Hindi: पनीर panīr; Urdu: پنير from Persian: پنير panir) is a fresh cheese common in South Asian cuisine. It is of Indian origin often referred in the Vedas dating back to 6000 BC. In eastern parts of India, it is generally called Chhena. It is an unaged, acid-set, non-melting farmer cheese or curd cheese made by curdling heated milk with lemon juice, vinegar, or any other food acids.
  • Chhena
  • Chhena (Hindi: छेना [ˈtʃʰeːnaː]) or Oriya: ଛେନା [tʃʰena]) or Chhana (Bengali: ছানা [tʃʰana]) is fresh, unripened curd cheese widely used in India and Bangladesh. A crumbly and moist form of farmers cheese or paneer, it is used to make desserts such as rasgulla. It is created in a similar process to paneer except it is not pressed for as long. It is most popular in Orissa and Bengal and is made from water buffalo milk. The earliest reference of cheese in India dates back to 1400 BCE.In Orissa, the typical process is like that of ricotta: the milk is boiled and then curdled with a small amount of whey, and the resulting coagulated component is collected and wrapped in cheesecloth, strained and beaten thoroughly, until it becomes quite firm. This mixture is kneaded well before use, so that it acquires a very soft and smooth consistency. Orissa is famous for desserts made of chhena, Rasagola, Rasabali, Chhena kheeri and Chhena poda being among the most popular. Chhena is consumed by lactose intolerant people.
  • Khoa
  • Khoa (also khoo-wah) is a milk food widely used in the Indian cuisine, made of either dried whole milk or milk thickened by heating in an open iron pan.It is similar to ricotta cheese, but lower in moisture and made from whole milk instead of whey.There are three types of khoya – batti, chickna, and daanedaar. Batti, meaning “rock,” has 50% moisture by weight and is the hardest of the three types; it can be grated like cheese. It can be aged for up to a year, during which it develops a unique aroma and a mouldy outer surface. Chickna (“slippery” or “squishy”) khoya has 80% moisture. For daanedaar, the milk is coagulated with an acid during the simmering; it has a moderate moisture content. Different types of khoya are used for different preparations.
  • Kalari or Kiladi or Maish Krej (Kashmiri: ميش کريج,)
  • Kalari or Maish Krej (Kashmiri: ميش کريج, Dogri: कलाड़ी or کلاڑی) is a traditional ripened cheese product indigenous to Jammu and Kashmir state of India. It is a very dense cheese that is usually fried in its own fat and salted prior to being eaten. Kalaris are usually made from cow’s milk, though kalaris made from goat’s milk are also available, and have a whitish color. Kalaris, traditionally a local hill cheese  product are an intrinsic part of Kashmiri and Dogra cuisine and often incorporated into other dishes, such as the “Kalari-Kulcha,” which is a popular snack in the Jammu region. In the Kashmir region, it is often prepared with tomatoes, after frying.

Iran

  • Lighvan Cheese
  • Lighvan (Persian: لیقوان‎) is a brined curd cheese traditionally made in Iran. Having a sour flavor, and a shape covered by holes, the cheese is produced from sheep’s milk. The name comes from Liqvan, a village in Tabriz, where it has traditionally been made. The milk is coagulated with rennet tablets, then the curd is packed into triangular cloth bags and is allowed to drain thoroughly. The triangular blocks of cheese, which are about 20cm thick, are removed from the bag and put in an earthenware pot. Then they are covered with salt, and are left for two days. The cheese is usually served for breakfast or dinner with bread while it is still fresh.

Japan

  • Sakura cheese
  • Sakura cheese is a soft cheese created in Hokkaidō, Japan. It is the first widely acclaimed Japanese cheese, as cheeses in general were a European/Mediterranean phenomenon until spread to the rest of the world during the days of European imperialism.This cheese is a creamy white, and is flavoured with mountain cherry leaves. Sakura means “cherry blossom” in Japanese.It has the rare distinction of winning a “gold medal” at the Mountain Cheese Olympics in Appenzell, Switzerland, which normally favors Swiss, Italian, or French cheeses almost exclusively for awards. The medal was in the “soft cheese” category.

Middle East

  • Akkawi
  • Akkawi cheese (Arabic: جبن عكاوي‎, also Akawi, Akawieh, and Ackawi) is a white brine cheese, native to the historical region of Palestine in modern day Israel. It is named after the city of Acre, where it first originated, the Arabic akkawi meaning “from akka”. It is commonly made using cow milk, but can be made with goat or sheep’s milk as well. It is now produced on a large scale in the Middle East, notably in Lebanon, Syria and Cyprus. A soft white cheese, it has a smooth texture and a mild salty taste. Commonly used as a table cheese, it is considered good by itself or paired with fruit.
  • Basket cheese
  • Basket is a cheese made from cow’s milk available fresh or dry. Fresh basket has no salt taste, while dry basket is mildly salty. Basket cheese gets its name from the way it is formed (inside a basket).
  • Labneh
  • Strained yoghurt, yoghurt cheese, labneh, or Greek yoghurt is yoghurt which has been strained in a cloth or paper bag or filter to remove the whey, giving a consistency between that of yoghurt and cheese, while preserving yoghurt’s distinctive sour taste. Like many yoghurts, strained yoghurt is often made from milk which has been enriched by boiling off some of the water content, or by adding extra butterfat and powdered milk. However most strained Greek yogurts have no added fats and are made of real milk.Yoghurt strained through muslin is a traditional food in the Levant, Eastern Mediterranean, Near East, and South Asia, where it is often used in cooking, as it is high enough in fat not to curdle at higher temperatures. It is used in both cooked and raw, savoury and sweet dishes. Due to the straining process to remove excess whey, even non-fat varieties are rich and creamy.In Western Europe and the U.S., strained yoghurt has become increasingly popular because it is richer in texture than unstrained yoghurt, but low in fat. Since the straining process removes some of the lactose, strained yoghurt is lower in sugar and carbohydrates than unstrained yoghurt.In fact, most of the recent growth in the $4.1 billion yoghurt industry has come from the strained yoghurt segment.In the West, the term “Greek yoghurt” has become synonymous with strained yoghurt due to successful marketing by the Greek Fage brand, though strained yoghurt is a staple in many countries besides Greece, and some Greek yogurts are not strained. “Greek-style” yoghurts are similar to Greek strained yoghurt, but may be thickened with thickening agents, or if made the traditional way, are based on domestic (rather than Greek) milk.
  • Jameed
  • Jameed (Arabic: جميد, literally “hardened”) is hard dry laban made from goat or ewe’s milk. Milk is kept in a fine woven cheesecloth to make a thick yogurt. Salt is added daily to thicken the yogurt even more and the outside of the yogurt filled cheesecloth is rinsed with water to allow any remaining whey to seep through. After a few days of salting the yogurt, it becomes very dense and it can be removed from the cheesecloth and shaped into round balls. It is then set to dry for a few days, if it’s dried in the sun it becomes yellow and if it’s dried in the shade it remains white, it is important that the jameed is dry to the core because any dampness can spoil the preservation process. It is also often referred to as “rock cheese”.
  • Jibneh Arabieh
  • Jibneh Arabieh (Arabic: جبنة عربية‎) is a simple cheese found all over the Middle East. It is particularly popular in the Persian Gulf area. The cheese has an open texture and a mild taste similar to Feta but less salty. The heritage of the product started with Bedouins using goat or sheep milk; however, current practice is to use cow‘s milk to make the cheese. Jibneh Arabieh is used for cooking, or simply as a table cheese.
  • Kashkawan
  • Kashkaval deriving from the Italian Caciocavallo, Romanian: cașcaval, Bulgarian: кашкавал, pronounced [kɐʃkɐˈvɑɫ], Macedonian: кашкавал, pronounced [kaʃkaˈval]; Turkish: kaşkaval, Serbian: качкаваљ or kačkavalj; Albanian : Kaçkavalli is a specific type of yellow cheese made of sheep milk . However, in Bulgaria, Republic of Macedonia, Serbia and Romania, the term is often used to refer to all yellow cheeses (or even any cheese other than sirene). In English-language menus in Bulgaria, “кашкавал” is always translated as “yellow cheese” (whereas sirene is usually translated as “white cheese” or simply “cheese”). The taste of the kashkaval is sometimes compared to that of the United Kingdom’s cheddar cheese, although variations exist.
  • Majdoule
  • Nabulsi cheese
  • Nabulsi (or naboulsi) is one of a number of Palestinian white brined cheeses made in the Middle East. Its name denotes its place of origin, Nablus, Palestine and it is well-known throughout the West Bank and surrounding regions. Nabulsi along, with Akkawi cheese are the principal cheeses consumed in Jordan[2], Palestine, Syria, and Lebanon. Produced primarily from sheep milk, goat‘s milk is also used. Nabulsi cheese is white and rectangular in shape. It is semi-hard with no gas holes. It becomes soft and elastic when heated. It is a typical ewe’s or goat’s milk cheese, but is traditionally flavored with mahlab (Prunus mahaleb) and mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) added to the boiling brine. It is can be eaten fresh as salty table cheese or can be fried in oil, and it is also a major ingredient of the Palestinian dessert knafeh
  • Paneer
  • Paneer (Hindi: पनीर panīr; Urdu: پنير from Persian: پنير panir) is a fresh cheese common in South Asian cuisine. It is of Indian origin often referred in the Vedas dating back to 6000 BC. In eastern parts of India, it is generally called Chhena. It is an unaged, acid-set, non-melting farmer cheese or curd cheese made by curdling heated milk with lemon juice, vinegar, or any other food acids.
  • Shanklish
  • Shanklish (Arabic: شنكليش‎ shanklīsh or شنغليش shanghlīsh), also known as shinklish, shankleesh, sorke, or sürke, is a type of cow’s milk or sheep milk cheese in Levantine in Palestinian, Lebanese, and Syrian cuisine. It is typically formed into balls of approximately 6 cm diameter, which are often covered in za’atar and Aleppo pepper, and then aged and dried. The most common spice is thyme, thus giving the cheese its appearance somewhat resembling a dirty tennis ball. Shanklish is also sold in much smaller balls or unformed.Shanklish varies greatly in its texture and flavour. Fresh cheeses have a soft texture and mild flavour; those dried and aged for a longer period become progressively harder and can acquire an extremely pungent odour and flavour. To make spicier cheeses, spices such as aniseed and chilli can be mixed in before the cheese is formed into balls. Spicy shanklish are often covered in chilli, especially in Syria, thus appear red. Shanklish from the Syrian coastal plain around Tartus and the adjoining northern Lebanese region of Akkar are considered particularly delectable; these tend to be hard, with a clean strong flavour and near-white colour.Shanklish is generally eaten with finely-chopped tomato, onion, and olive oil; and often accompanied by araq. It is a common meze dish. Shanklish is also mashed up with eggs or crushed in a pita with cucumbers, mint, and olive oil for breakfast.
  • Fumunda cheese
  • Syrian cheese

There are numerous different kinds of Syrian cheese. Some of the most common are:

  • Ackawi , a white cheese with complex flavor. Primarily used as a table cheese. Also spelled Akawi and Akawieh.
  • Baladi , soft-white, smooth, creamy cheese has a mild flavor. The cheese tastes delicious spread on fresh bread or crackers. It is eaten for breakfast or snacks.
  • Charkassiye, a soft, fresh cheese
  • Jibneh Arabieh (Arabic for: Arab Cheese), is a simple cheese found all over the Middle East. It is particularly popular in Egypt and Arab countries of the Persian Gulf. The cheese has an open texture and a mild taste. The heritage of the product started with Bedouins, using goat or sheep milk, however current practice is to use cow’s milk to make the cheese. Jibneh Arabieh is used for cooking, or simply as a table cheese.
  • Jibne Khadra Arabic for green cheese, is a white hard cheese with a pronounced salty taste, often boiled before eating
  • Kenafa , is an unsalted, very fresh, soft cheese that melts easily and freely. It is used to make the popular “cheesecake”, like dessert that is sometimes called Kenafa by people in the Middle East. It can also be used as a base for other sweet cheese desserts. It is sold frozen because there is no salt in it and is available in both retail and bulk packages.
  • Majdoule, a salty white cheese made up of thick strands of cheese braided together (hence the name)
  • Shelal, a salty white cheese made up of strands of cheese woven together
  • Surke, sorke or shanklish, a mature cheese made with spices and generally presented as balls of cheese covered in za’tar orchile powder; most often eaten as a starter dish with tomato, oil and sometimes onion
  • Turkomani, a soft porous cheese with a delicate flavour

Mongolia

Nepal

  • Flower of Rajya
  • Flower of Rajya is a firm yak‘s-milk cheese made in Nepal by Tibetan nomads in collaboration with the Trace Foundation. Milk is heated and ripened in big copper vats, curdled, drained and molded into 10-12 pound wheels. The cheese is dry-cured in Tibetan red salt, aged, then wrapped in scarves and packed in bamboo baskets.

Philippines

South Korea

  • Imsil Cheese
  • Imsil is a county in North Jeolla Province, Republic of Korea, approximately 30 minutes south of Jeonju by car or bus, where purely domestic Korean cheese was first produced. Imsil County encompasses several important towns, mountains and natural areas.Imsil Cheese Village is located near the town of Imsil (within the county of Imsil). It offers a one day or more vacation program for children and tourists to learn how to ferment cheese.The cheese produced there is called Imsil cheese, following the county name. Imsil cheese is the unusual mission legacy of a Catholic priest from Belgium who took the Korean name of Ji Junghwan. He arrived in the farming village of Imsil, in the mid-1950s, when the economy was still shattered from the Korean war. He started a farmers’ milk cooperative. This cooperative eventually became the Imsil Cheese Factory, which exists today and produces high quality cheese and yogurt for the Korean market.A pizza franchise using Imsil cheese has become a widespread business in South Korea since 2004, under the name of Imsil Cheese Pizza. Nearby livestock farms produce the dairy products required for the manufacture of the cheese.A group of enterprising cheese manufacturers decided to branch out into making cheese pizza. In time, Ji Junghwan’s Imsil Cheese Pizza became one of the most popular brands, and today it can be found throughout Korea. Pictured on every box is the Belgian missionary priest, probably the only missionary in the world to have left a pizza chain as part of his legacy.The village is in a rural area, with only a bus running there every hour, and stops at 8pm. It is best not to get stranded past 8pm. You can take the Shi-Hae intercity bus terminal in Jeonju and hop on an imsil bus. Fares differs from district to district. Kang-jin District cost 4800won, while the rest of imsil cost about 3800won. Imsil is known for its natural Scenery. There is a university in Imsil called “Yewon Arts University” people go there to study arts, dance and other activities.It has 14 elementary schools, and there is an English village

 

Just to give You a hint on what goes with what …

 

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Published on September 19, 2012 at 08:28  Comments (2)  

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Fantastic items from you, man.
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  2. I read this piece of writing completely and it’s amazing !


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